4 Things to Evaluate Before You Say ‘Yes’ to a Job Offer

Interviewing for, and being offered a new job, can be an exciting time, especially if it’s for a role or within a company that you have wanted for a while.  

But what many job seekers don’t consider is this – is this the right job to progress my career forward, or is this role simply what I am looking for ‘right now’? 

There are many things that a jobseeker must consider before making the decision; it is about far more than just the salary. 

Here are the most crucial points to consider before you say yes to your next job offer. 

 

1. Look at the Job Offer in Detail 

 

 

When you have interviewed for a position you really want, and you get the call from the recruiter with the offer, it can be tempting to say ‘yes’ straight away, but it is essential to read the full contract before you sign. 

In an interview, the manager might have promised a range of benefits, certain perks, or an alluring description of the role; I’ll talk more about this in the next section. But sometimes, the contract that is presented to you can be different from what you were promised in your interview; are the working hours the same as what was stated in the interview? Are there any surprises in the contract that were not mentioned to you?  

Sometimes this is not done out of malice; the hiring manager may have simply overlooked or misremembered these points. You do not have to accept the offer straight away, you can call the manager to talk over any concerns you might have at this point, and if you need longer to decide – ask when is the latest that they need your answer by. 

Read the contract thoroughly and weigh up the pros and possible cons of this job vs your current role by using a comparison list, like this one from The Balance. 

 

2. Consider the Benefits and Perks 

The added benefits that accompany your salary can be a deal-breaker for many candidates – with some people believing that they are more important than the salary itself.  

Yes, it can be tempting to take a new job when the salary is considerably higher than your current one, but I advise you to think carefully about how beneficial the benefits in your job offer are. 

It is considered that perks can represent up to around 30% of your compensation package, and a good benefits package should include health insurance and retirement plans. 

Additional benefits such as dental, vision and life insurance, are great perks to consider and are generally better for you in the long run than a small amount of extra salary. 

 

3. Training and Development

 

Many of the candidates I work with tell me that their number one reason for looking for a new job is that they felt that their role had no future – their manager or company were not interested in developing them, and so their job title and prospects were likely to stay the same for as long as they were in that position. 

Training and development is a big deal to candidates – knowing that your employer is invested in your career is a primary reason to stay and grow with the company. 

If the interviewer doesn’t mention training and development during the interview – be sure to ask. Moving to a company who will invest in your training and development is always a better choice than staying with one that won’t. 

If you are sure that the salary and compensation package, as well as the growth opportunities, will be beneficial to your career, there is just one point left to consider – the company’s culture. 

 

4. Company Culture  

Before you attended your interview with this company, what made you apply? Was it the way that the company presented itself in the job advert, did they appeal to you after doing some online research, or were they already on your radar? 

It is understandable that some people are tempted by a job offer because of a dazzling salary, but it is crucial that as a jobseeker you ask yourself ‘can I really see myself being happy here? 

 

 

A poor culture fit is one of the main reasons that people leave their job – with 69% of respondents in one study stating that they were looking to leave their current role as soon as possible due to a poor culture fit. 

When you think about the reality of the situation, would you really be able to last long enough in a job where you were unhappy with to make it worthwhile? During the interview and throughout the recruitment process, think carefully about the culture and the ‘feel’ of the company.  

Does the organisation have a diverse and happy workforce? Do they value honesty and honesty in their mission statement? Do they encourage employees to maintain a healthy work-life balance, or have you picked up on the fact that a degree of unpaid overtime is the ‘norm’?  

It isn’t always easy to find these things out before you start, but you can do your best to discover more by carefully looking at their website, social media profiles and even reaching out to members of staff on LinkedIn to get an idea of the attitudes and behaviours that the team exhibit.  

 

Finally 

If you are looking for your next job in finance, accountancy, HR, business intelligence, plus many more sectors, start your conversation with Jobfitts today. 

Our approach of finding candidates their perfect role is so successful that 98% of our placements stay in position for at least two years – what are you waiting for? Contact us today.  

  

Thanks,  

Amrutha Murali