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4 Things to Evaluate Before You Say ‘Yes’ to a Job Offer

Interviewing for, and being offered a new job, can be an exciting time, especially if it’s for a role or within a company that you have wanted for a while.  

But what many job seekers don’t consider is this – is this the right job to progress my career forward, or is this role simply what I am looking for ‘right now’? 

There are many things that a jobseeker must consider before making the decision; it is about far more than just the salary. 

Here are the most crucial points to consider before you say yes to your next job offer. 

 

1. Look at the Job Offer in Detail 

 

 

When you have interviewed for a position you really want, and you get the call from the recruiter with the offer, it can be tempting to say ‘yes’ straight away, but it is essential to read the full contract before you sign. 

In an interview, the manager might have promised a range of benefits, certain perks, or an alluring description of the role; I’ll talk more about this in the next section. But sometimes, the contract that is presented to you can be different from what you were promised in your interview; are the working hours the same as what was stated in the interview? Are there any surprises in the contract that were not mentioned to you?  

Sometimes this is not done out of malice; the hiring manager may have simply overlooked or misremembered these points. You do not have to accept the offer straight away, you can call the manager to talk over any concerns you might have at this point, and if you need longer to decide – ask when is the latest that they need your answer by. 

Read the contract thoroughly and weigh up the pros and possible cons of this job vs your current role by using a comparison list, like this one from The Balance. 

 

2. Consider the Benefits and Perks 

The added benefits that accompany your salary can be a deal-breaker for many candidates – with some people believing that they are more important than the salary itself.  

Yes, it can be tempting to take a new job when the salary is considerably higher than your current one, but I advise you to think carefully about how beneficial the benefits in your job offer are. 

It is considered that perks can represent up to around 30% of your compensation package, and a good benefits package should include health insurance and retirement plans. 

Additional benefits such as dental, vision and life insurance, are great perks to consider and are generally better for you in the long run than a small amount of extra salary. 

 

3. Training and Development

 

Many of the candidates I work with tell me that their number one reason for looking for a new job is that they felt that their role had no future – their manager or company were not interested in developing them, and so their job title and prospects were likely to stay the same for as long as they were in that position. 

Training and development is a big deal to candidates – knowing that your employer is invested in your career is a primary reason to stay and grow with the company. 

If the interviewer doesn’t mention training and development during the interview – be sure to ask. Moving to a company who will invest in your training and development is always a better choice than staying with one that won’t. 

If you are sure that the salary and compensation package, as well as the growth opportunities, will be beneficial to your career, there is just one point left to consider – the company’s culture. 

 

4. Company Culture  

Before you attended your interview with this company, what made you apply? Was it the way that the company presented itself in the job advert, did they appeal to you after doing some online research, or were they already on your radar? 

It is understandable that some people are tempted by a job offer because of a dazzling salary, but it is crucial that as a jobseeker you ask yourself ‘can I really see myself being happy here? 

 

 

A poor culture fit is one of the main reasons that people leave their job – with 69% of respondents in one study stating that they were looking to leave their current role as soon as possible due to a poor culture fit. 

When you think about the reality of the situation, would you really be able to last long enough in a job where you were unhappy with to make it worthwhile? During the interview and throughout the recruitment process, think carefully about the culture and the ‘feel’ of the company.  

Does the organisation have a diverse and happy workforce? Do they value honesty and honesty in their mission statement? Do they encourage employees to maintain a healthy work-life balance, or have you picked up on the fact that a degree of unpaid overtime is the ‘norm’?  

It isn’t always easy to find these things out before you start, but you can do your best to discover more by carefully looking at their website, social media profiles and even reaching out to members of staff on LinkedIn to get an idea of the attitudes and behaviours that the team exhibit.  

 

Finally 

If you are looking for your next job in finance, accountancy, HR, business intelligence, plus many more sectors, start your conversation with Jobfitts today. 

Our approach of finding candidates their perfect role is so successful that 98% of our placements stay in position for at least two years – what are you waiting for? Contact us today.  

  

Thanks,  

Amrutha Murali 

Why Quality Candidates Are Rejecting Your Job Offers This Year

The number of job vacancies in Australia is at an all-time high, with 242,900 at the last count. While this represents strong economy, which is ultimately good for business, it leads to issues when it comes to recruiting. 

A tight job market means that candidates have their choice of available jobs – so companies must work harder to attract the attention of the best candidates. 

As a recruiter, I understand how frustrating it can be when a potentially excellent candidate match falls through – for whatever the reason, but it can be particularly difficult when the candidate chooses to work for a competitor instead of you. 

So, I have put together this guide on the main reasons candidates are likely to reject your job offer, so you will know what to avoid to get the quality candidates to say ‘yes’. 

 

Your Compensation Package Isn’t Good Enough 

First and foremost, you must be offering your candidates salary and benefits package which is at least as good the other companies your candidates will likely have considered. 

While a competitive salary is a must, employers are having to be increasingly market-aware when it comes to giving candidates an offer they can’t refuse. 

Just recently I was working with a candidate who was considering two similar job offers; the salary offered in both positions was comparable, but the deciding factor was that one company was offering a much better health insurance package and the availability to work from home sometimes  – the candidate had a young family and these benefits really spoke to her. 

If you can offer candidates benefits such as  

  • Healthcare insurance 
  • Additional Superannuation  
  • A company car 
  • Work laptop/mobile 
  • Homeworking opportunities 
  • Flexible working hours 
  • Gym membership 
  • Subsidised food and drink 
  • Commission (if applicable) 

Then you are more likely to be seen as a more attractive employer to all potential employees. These perks are more than affordable for larger companies, and they will pay dividends in attracting the best talent and creating a happier working environment. 

 

Little Chance of Promotion 

The workforce of the last 30 years has been dominated by boomers; however, this is set to change. It is estimated that by 2020, millennials and X-ers will make up 35% and 35% of the workforce respectively, with boomers accounting for a mere 6%.   

Younger workers have felt a sense of frustration that they don’t stand a chance of being promoted to above, or even equal to, their more experienced superiors. 

 So, offering promotion prospects to Gen X, millennial and Gen Z employees is a reliable way to attract them to your organisation. 

A recent Business Insider survey found that more than 75% of Gen Z workers believed that they should be promoted within their first year of work. When a promotion is simply not an option, employers are offering substitutes such as a raise, being offered a new title and ‘workversary’ celebrations so that they feel valued. 

If you can offer some of these promotion-related benefits perks, this will help in getting your candidate to say yes to your offer. 

 

Your Recruitment Process is Too Slow 

One of the main benefits companies report in working with recruiters is that the speeding up of the process drastically reduces the number of great candidates who drop out of the process along the way. 

One of the main reasons we hear from candidates as to why they remove themselves from the recruitment process is that the process takes too long and in that time, another company has made them an offer that they decide to take instead. Even candidates who are particularly interested in your company over another can be tempted away by a swift recruitment process.   

It is widely accepted that your time to fill should be as short as possible. The Society of Human Resource Management reports the average time to fill is 42 days – how does your company measure up? 

 

Your Culture Doesn’t Speak to Them 

Many smaller companies fall into the trap of believing that creating a great ‘company culture’ is reserved for bigger organisations. 

There is the idea that you need to spend lots of time (and money) on staff away-days, employee events and programs, office relaxation spaces and monthly guest speakers – but it does not have to be this involved. 

Creating a positive company culture can be attainable for every single business, all you need is two things. Firstly, a company ethos and mission statement which you have thought about carefully, and secondlyto hire people who fit into the ethos and agree with the mission statement. 

I have worked with companies of all sizes, and great company culture is not something which is only achievable for a select few, nor is size important – I have witnessed fantastic company culture from a range of differently-sized businesses. 

In order to highlight to candidates why your organisation should be their first choice, tell them about your culture in the interview. If possible, take them into the office to see how employees interact with each other, and direct them to your company social media where they can see what values your organisation stands for. 

Remember, this is also a two-way street; both you and the candidate need to discern if this is a partnership that will work out.  

If you need help, not only attracting the best candidates to interview with your company but to say yes to the final job offer – get in touch with us today to find out how we can help.  

 

Thanks,  

Amrutha Murali