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What Job Seekers Are Really Looking For In The Current Market

How well do you really understand the needs and motivations of the job seekers in your sector? Perhaps not as well as you might think. 

At a recent recruitment expo we attended one of the speakers shared data from a very compelling study which revealed that what recruiters think candidates want out of a job is often quite at odds with what most are looking for 

The research found that 70% of recruiters interviewed said that advancement was what candidates most sought in a role, followed closely by money and work-life balance. Interestingly, when the researchers asked candidates what they most looked for from employers, they cited the same three things, but in a completely different order: compensation, work-life balance, and advancement.  

Just as telling were the things that candidates cited as important that recruiters hadn’t even mentioned: over 20% of all candidates interviewed said that company ethics, working from home, and commute were important factors, but none of these even appeared on the recruiters’ radar.  

If we’re not truly understanding what is important to candidates, then we’re missing an opportunity in how we can message to them, thus enabling our marketing to work more effectively.  

To help you develop your talent pipeline for 2019, here are 7 things candidates are currently looking for in today’s market. 

 

1. Competitive Compensation and Perks 

 

 

Regardless of generation, gender, and geography, employees want to be compensated fairly for the work they do. However, compensation needn’t be thought of only in terms of monetary value.  

Candidates are becoming increasingly concerned not only with the basic salary they are offered but with all the other perks that they may or may not be offered as part of their contract. A robust pension package, private healthcare benefits, gym membership and other rewards are all valuable incentives which can help to recruit and retain talent in a candidate driven market.  

Together with a competitive salary, perks go a long way in showing employees that they are valued.  

 

2. Flexibility & Work-Life Balance 

It’s clear that the strict nine-to-five workday is outdated – and it won’t help employers attract or maintain today’s top talent. The 2018 Global Talent Trends study found that 51% of employees wished their company offered more flexible work options.  

No matter the industry, flexible working hours, remote working opportunities, and generous holiday packages are increasingly on the wish list of many job seekers. 

A study on the benefits most valued by job seekers published in the Harvard Business Review revealed that eighty-eight percent of respondents were more likely to seriously consider a job offering flexible hours, while 80% stated that having more vacation time was an appealing perk.  

 

3. Training and Advancement 

Training often goes in tandem with advancement and career growth; you can’t really have one without the other. Opportunities for professional development offer many benefits to both employees and employers, from increased retention and healthier company culture to improved efficiency.  

Employers who offer clear career paths and are prepared to invest in continued professional development for their staff are likely to attract and keep the best applicants because it shows that a company is invested in their future. Staff are more likely to leave because of lack of opportunities than for any other reason.  

 

4. Great Culture & Collaboration 

 

 

Fostering and encouraging a collaborative culture can have many positives, from building a cohesive and empowered team to nurturing creativity. Great employees want to work in a supportive and collaborative environment where they can thrive creatively.  

Just as with providing perks and opportunities for professional growth, creating and maintaining a safe, accepting and collaborative culture for your employees will go a long way in showing how much you value them. You can do this by encouraging collaboration and recognising your employees for their contributions and achievements. 

 

5. Company Ethics 

In addition to company culture, a company’s values convey a strong message, and it’s important for employees to feel like their values are aligned to those of the company. Regardless of your industryadhering to high ethical standards is more important than ever in retaining employees.  

Creating a culture that nurtures employee wellbeing, encourages hands-on learning and forgives mistakes can make candidates believe that your company is where they want to be, which will increase both retention and productivity. 

 

6. Sense of Purpose 

Perhaps the most underrated aspiration of today’s job seekers is the desire to work with a purpose. Many of today’s job seekers would be willing to give up certain perks in exchange for more fulfilling work.  

Unfortunately, it seems that offering employees a sense of purpose is overlooked by many companies in today’s profit-focused world. Without a sense of purpose, it’s difficult for employees to connect with their work and their company.  

In addition to increased retention, ensuring your employees feel a sense of purpose in their work will boost productivity, morale, and overall job satisfaction.  

 

7. Accessible leadership 

 

 

Today’s professionals want to connect and work closely with company leadership. Job seekers are looking for a company culture that values employees at every level, where managers and team members work together to achieve their goals. 

You should, therefore, encourage your employees to communicate openly and often. Invite team members to discuss any topic, and check in regularly with each employee to discuss and diffuse problems, concerns, and conflicts. 

By building relationships with employees based on mutual respect and transparency, you will set the tone for a positive company culture, where leadership integrates into the team and builds meaningful relationships with each team member. 

 

About JobFitts 

JobFitts Consultants are a specialist provider of professional Recruitment Services for the Financial Services sector and related suppliers in Australia. Since 2003 we have recruited and placed a breadth of operational roles at all levels from HR, Accounting, Marketing and Customer Service/Frontline. 

To find out more visit our website at JobFitts here or call us on (02) 9220 3595 or email here.

How To Be Viewed As A Fair Manager

Treating your employees fairly seems like such a simple thing. And yet, research suggests that the day-to-day demands and stress of management often make doing the right thing anything but easy.   

Studies also reveal, however, that employees who are treated fairly feel respected and valued, and as a result, are more productive and loyal and are more likely to stay and grow in your company.  

Not only will your employees respect you and believe in you more as a leader; by treating them fairly, you’ll also be fostering a culture where your employees will treat each other with fairness and respect.  

In fact, being a fair manager is the cornerstone to creating a positive company culture that will retain the best talent. With that in mind, here are seven proven strategies that will help you to become the fairest of them all. 

 

Don’t Play Favourites 

 

 

One of the quickest ways of being viewed as unfair is by having different standards for different team members, which becomes especially apparent when some team members are allowed certain benefits that others are not. This approach can particularly backfire if poor performers are allowed to slide.  

A fair manager does not play favourites. Regardless of how you might personally feel about certain employees, you should never let personal bias get in the way of your professional decision making.  

 

Don’t Confuse Equal With Fair

Just remember that equal and fair are two different things; while you should treat everyone fairly, this will look different depending on who you are dealing with. Treating everyone equally doesn’t equate to treating everyone fairly. 

The important thing to consider is that every employee is unique; they all have different work ethics, styles, skill sets, responsibilities and goals. For example, you might have two employees in the same role, but with very different attitudes and work ethics. If employee A works very hard, consistently going above and beyond, while employee B simply works to meet the quota, should they be treated exactly the same? 

If they are treated equally, employee A might start to resent the lack of recognition for all her hard work and lose motivation and interest in your company. Whereas if they were treated fairly, employee A would receive an increase in pay, a promotion or some other kind of recognition, which would serve as an incentive to employee BEqual is not fair. 

 

Be A Role Model 

If you want to be viewed as fair, you can’t just talk the talk; you also have to walk the walk. 

Employees want and need a leader who not only achieves great things but who embodies great ideals. If you set the bar high for your staff, you have to set the bar even higher for yourself.  

Applying rules equally to everyone means applying them to yourself, as well. You have to model the behaviour you want to see in your team. If they see that you don’t practice what you preach, they’ll not only lose respect for you; they’ll not respect the rules or values of the company. 

By focusing on the big picture and demonstrating the highest values, others will admire and respect you as a true leader. Remember, if you teach through your actions and model the behaviour of “fairness” in the workplace, others will follow your lead. 

 

Give Your Employees A Voice  

 

 

The positive impact of having open communication and feedback from your team cannot be understated.  

As with being a role model, if you want to encourage open communication among your team, you have to take the time tlisten tyour employees concerns and be accessible. This means more than just having an opendoor policy. Make sure your colleagues know that you’re always available.  

In addition to fostering open communication between you and your employees, you should implement and encourage employee feedback. Giving your employees a voice and acting on their feedback and concerns will establish you as fair and caring manager. 

 

Be Open & Honest 

Another aspect of fostering open communication is modelling what this looks like with your staff. If you say what you mean and mean what you say, your employees will always know what to expect from you and where they stand with you.  

Being open and honest with your staff means telling thewhy a specific procedure was put in place or explaining the rationale behind difficult decisions or changes. 

When you are honest with your employees, you are treating them fairly; it also shows that you respect and value them. 

 

Treat Everyone With Dignity and Respect 

When in doubt, stick with the golden rule: treat everyone ayou would like to be treated. Remember, employees do not leave jobs; they leave bad managers.  

If you want the respect of your employeesyou must show them respect in turn. This means valuing and respecting the dignity of each member on your team.  

Deception, manipulation, micromanagement, and undermining employee efforts will only lead to distrust and disgruntlement among your team; without honesty and trust, there can be no mutual respect.  

 

Recognise Employee Contributions 

 

 

Praise and recognition are two tenets of good management and gaining the respect of your staff. Showing genuine appreciation for a job well done is one of the best ways to build a strong following of admiration. 

When someone does great work, makes a good suggestion, or makes a positive contribution to the team’s success, a fair manager provides positive feedback and finds a reason to celebrate. 

Employees appreciate sincere and specific recognition of their contributions and achievements. Effectively recognising your team members will not only increase their sense of belonging in your company, but it will also increase their commitment to their role, resulting in a happier and more productive employee.  

 

About JobFitts 

JobFitts Consultants are a specialist provider of professional Recruitment Services for the Financial Services sector and related suppliers in Australia. Since 2003 we have recruited and placed a breadth of operational roles at all levels from HR, Accounting, Marketing and Customer Service/Frontline. 

To find out more visit our website at JobFitts here or call us on (02) 9220 3595 or email here.

How To Deal With Change In The Workplace

Change is the only true constant. This aphorism is as true today as it was centuries ago.  

While many of us often look forward to changes in our lives or at work – daydreaming or pontificating about how things could be different – when things do actually change, we often feel caught off guard and unprepared. 

It’s one thing to be the one who suggests or initiates a change, but when you’re not in the driver’s seat as it were, unable to control what’s happening around you, change can be an unsettling, disenfranchising and downright scary prospect. It’s all too easy to become overwhelmed by doubt and uncertainty.  

However, change does not have to culminate in fear and anxiety.  As individuals, we have a lot of personal control over how we deal with the changes we are faced with; it’s ultimately up to you how you choose to perceive or handle change.  

With that in mind, here are four tested strategies for making the most of change in the workplace. 

 

Stay Positive & Optimistic 

 

 

Although this can be easier said than done, maintaining a positive attitude in the face of change is crucial for being able to thrive in your career. The ability to adapt to change is one of the most crucial attributes for any employee. Regardless of the new circumstances, you should always strive to be optimistic and maintain a good attitude.  

Even though you may not be satisfied with certain aspects of a particular change, you can still be optimistic about what possibilities it might yield. For example, you may not like certain things about a new role you’ve been required to take on, but you never know what a year in this position might ultimately do for your career. You might grow to love the very things that you currently think you don’t like; it might even lead you onto a different (and more satisfying) career path that you might not have otherwise considered. 

While the new situation you find yourself in may not be perfect, the old one most likely wasn’t perfect either. Rather than fretting or stewing about what you don’t like about it, focus on how you can best leverage your skills, experiences and network to make the most of the changes. Thinking of ways you make the change work to your advantage will help you to take ownership of it, thus making you feel more in control. However, maintaining a negative attitude about the change will only result in alienating yourself from the rest of your team. 

 

Be Flexible & Open 

Rather than stifling your creativity and potential with a rigid mindset, try to be flexible and open to new ideas and possibilities. Instead of viewing the change solely as negative, try to view it as a career opportunity. By adopting an open attitude of anticipation and getting involved in new committees and work teams, you can make yourself part of the change.  

Instead of fighting or fearing change, try to keep yourself open and flexible to new challenges and tasks. If you approach change with an open attitude of learning – even if you don’t like something new in the system – people will want to work with you, and you’ll have a greater chance of making a positive impact on those around and the company as a whole 

By having the flexibility to become an influencer and driver of change, you will feel empowered and less fearful, enabling you (and those around you) to embrace the positive aspects going forward. 

 

Be Proactive, Not Reactive 

 

 

This brings us to an important point; when faced with change that’s not of our own making, it’s all too easy to become reactive. Once put on the defensive, we may worry endlessly about, resist or openly fight against new developments. From this perspective, people are often only able to see the negative aspects of a given change. However, these are all reactive responses, and when we react defensively, we deprive ourselves of the opportunity to become part of the change. 

If we can learn to shift our mindset to enable ourselves to become proactive, a whole new world of possibilities will open up to us. Not only do we act more responsibly when we make proactive decisions, but we’re able to make positive contributions that allow the entire team/project to succeed. Being proactive is about being a team player and keeping the bigger picture in mind.  

One of the ways you could be proactive in coping with workplace change is by learning new skills. Make a list of the skills that are required for your new role or responsibilities and invest time each week in developing them. Taking on more responsibility or acquiring new skills not only makes you more valuable in your company; it also makes you more marketable down the road to prospective employers.  

Another proactive strategy is to look for ways you can help others cope with the change. One of the best ways to deal with your new position is to help others get situated while you are trying to figure it out yourself. Teaching is the best way of learning. By helping others in this way, they will be more inclined to want to help you in return. Lending guidance and helping hand in a difficult period of transition will also help to establish you as leadership material in the eyes of management.  

 

Focus On Communication 

 

 

A big part of being proactive and adapting successfully to workplace changes is to be an effective communicator. Clear, open communication is the key to success in any new role/team 

Communicate with others to learn your new role. Find those that have already been in your role and get them to teach you everything you need to know so you can get up to speed. Ask as many questions as possible about your new role or responsibilities. This will show people that you value their insight and take your new responsibilities seriously.  

Communication is always important, but it becomes even more crucial during times of change. Part of the fear of change is the unknown. If the leadership of your company is not communicating change effectively, make it your business to be proactive in finding out more about what the change involves.  

The bottom line is, change is inevitable for all organisations today, so you’ll need to overcome your fear of it. Change can be disruptive, even frightening, but it will always be there. With the right attitude, outlook and actions, you can find opportunities for making the most of it. 

 

About JobFitts 

JobFitts Consultants are a specialist provider of professional Recruitment Services for the Financial Services sector and related suppliers in Australia. Since 2003 we have recruited and placed a breadth of operational roles at all levels from HR, Accounting, Marketing and Customer Service/Frontline. 

 

To find out more visit our website at JobFitts here or call us on (02) 9220 3595 or email here.

Feedback: How To Help Your Team Members Excel

Feedback is one of the ‘hot’ topics in business today in every industry.

In a workforce that is increasingly dominated by Millennials, we are led to believe they want more feedback than any previous generation. As a result, some organisations are both creating feedback cultures and introducing peer to peer feedback 

It is with interest then that I read an article in Harvard Business Review questioning the value of feedback as we know it.  

In this article, I want to explore some of the reasons why feedback doesn’t always work as well  as we want it to and what you can do differently.  

 

What Stops Feedback From Working AWell AYou Want?  

1. A Managers Area Of Focus

 

 

Too often it’s easier to identify what isn’t working than what is.

Let’s be honest; many high achievers find it easier to generate a list of what their development needs are than what their fundamental strengths are. Similarly, this behavioural pattern is then repeated when a manager is observing or reviewing a team members performance too. 

Likewise, I have often heard managers talk about how little motivational feedback they received at different stages in their career. As a result, two things can happen: 

a) They didn’t give motivational feedback as they’re not accustomed to its benefits. 

b) Managers praise too much and offer too little development feedback. 
 

2. Lack Of Capability

I was talking with a colleague recently who said they had been managing for five years before they went on a formal management training programme. Luckily, they had a good role model who had highly advanced coaching skills

Her peer group, however, sadly were not quite so fortunate and as a result, were somewhat clumsy in giving feedback and in some instances would avoid it altogether, mainly if they were concerned about upsetting their team member. 

The consequence, unfortunately, is that no-one knows where they’re going wronghow their performance could improve, or what they are doing well. 
 

3. Timeliness Of Feedback

If you are having monthly one to ones with your team and using this as your opportunity to share feedback, it will have less impact. Not only will your recollection of the detail of a situation have dimmed in your own mind, but also in your employees. 

The impact is that the conversation will have less value. Which also leads me to my next point.  
 

4. The Quality Of A Managers Feedback.

 

 

If we haven’t used the following statement ourselves at some point in our career, we will have had it said to us…….. Good Job! 

I don’t know about you and the first thing that cometo my mind when I hear this is, ‘OK, so what did I do that you liked?’ 

If an employee lacks the specifics of a behaviour or action that they can identify that they did well or could improve then how can they repeat it again?  

What You Can Do Differently

Let me be blunt about this. Stop using phrases such as: 

You need to improve …

You should do…

Instead use: 

Here’s what I would do or 

Here’s what worked best for me and why 

These two phrases remove the implied judgement of the words ‘need’ and ‘should’. When I hear these two words, I find the voice in my head saying…and what if I don’t do it?!
 

Share Specific Positive Behavioural Examples

Use specific behavioural examples where you share not only what the person did well, but the outcome and how it made you feel. Yes, you did read that correctly, share how it made you feel

Maybe you heard one of your team handle a challenging conversation with a client, who they moved from anger to calm in a matter of minutes. 

Take a moment and stop to highlight the specifics of what you heard and saw and how proud you felt about the way they handled it. Let the individual know this is the specific behaviour you are looking for each day. 
 

Important: Share Only What You Have Observed.

Focus on what you have personally observed and stay away from what others have said. If colleague has brought something to your attention, encourage them to share the behaviour, outcome and how they felt. 

Use An Employees Past Experiences To Help Them In The Present And Future

 

 

Marcus Buckingham, the author of the HBR article I mentioned earlier, suggests a practical approach where employees use their own experiences and resources to overcome problems and challenges
 

When an employee has a problem, he suggests that managers ask their team member to focus on three things that are currently working well for them (present). This question shifts the individual’s mindset into a positive, resourceful state. 

The next step is to say, When you have had similar problems to your current one previously, how did you handle it? (past).

The employee generally has several examples they can relateThe final ‘future’ step is to ask, ‘what do you already know that can work in this situation?’ (back to the present).
 

While you may find some of these ideas a little different, how well is your current approach to feedback working for you? If you are unsure, test the new methods for yourself and notice the difference 

It is both easy and rewarding to learn different strategies to develop your team in a way that motivates, encourages, and guides them towards higher levels of performance and excellence. 

 

Thanks, 

 

Amrutha 

 

 

About JobFitts 

JobFitts Consultants are a specialist provider of professional Recruitment Services for the Financial Services sector and related suppliers in Australia. Since 2003 we have recruited and placed a breadth of operational roles at all levels from HR, Accounting, Marketing and Customer Service/Frontline. 

 

To find out more visit our website at JobFitts here or call us on (02) 9220 3595 or email here.

5 Must-Have Management Skills For The Digital Era Part 2

In a world where there is constant progression with technology, and artificial intelligence is used in ever increasing areas within organisations, it is, without doubt, a digital and disruptive workplace like nothing we have experienced before. 

As a manager or senior leader responsible for management development, there will be a question that has occupied your thinking at times that goes like this: For managers to succeed in the digital age, what are their “must have skills”? 

Only when you can answer this question can you then begin to think about how your organisation supports managers to build and develop this skill set. 

In part 2 of this series, we will share the final two must-have skills: Agility and Flexibility.  If you haven’t yet read part 1 where we discussed Communication Skills, Emotional Intelligence and Ethical Compass, you can read it here.

 

Agility

 

 

Let’s start by exploring what we mean by agility: “quick and well-coordinated movement.

Agility is a word frequently used in IT teams and comes from the agile frameworks that IT teams use to manage development projects. It is, however, a skill that applies to managers in other functions too.  

Without getting into the detail of agile working and self-managing teams plus the debate about what  is the role of an ‘agile manager’, here are some examples of the kind of mindset an agile manager has.

 

Able To Remove Road Blocks

These managers are great at removing blocks that limit the efficiency and effectiveness of their team and colleagues. 

Roadblocks are found in organisations systems and processes. In this instance, an agile manager will facilitate and influence to remove the blocks and create processes that serve the organisation
more effectively. 

 

Servant Leadership

 

 

A great agile manager is a servant leader to their team. This means they demonstrate ethical and caring behaviours, putting others needs ahead of their own. They are humble, knowledgeable, positive, social and emotionally intelligent. As someone who can remove blocks, they are empathic and have strong listening skills.
 

Understands Resources

A manager has numerous resources at their disposal including paper, phones, technology and people. With so many resources available in this digital age in which we live, it’s easy to forget people and the need to communicate. 

A team are both a highly valuable resource and asset. An agile manager will always remember that people are humans, not plug in and press machines.

 

Connections

 

 

An old mentor once said to me, Amrutha, “Your network is your net-worth”. It was at a time when  I was developing my networking skills and contacts. At the time I didn’t quite appreciate how true this is. 

We all have strong connection with family, friends and colleagues we are closest to. However, in this connected world we live in, with social networks like LinkedIn and Facebook, there is an opportunity to have a large network of connections where we can manage the strength and depth of relationships. 

Unlike many years ago, it’s much easier for these connections to be global. If you are a manager 
with a smaller network, make it a priority to align yourself with a colleague or peer who does have an extensive network that they are happy for you to tap into in order to assist and support your team to achieve their goals. 

I realise that this list of skills could have been even longer. If there are some skills that would have been in your top five that I have omitted, drop me an email and let me know. 

Thanks, 

 

Amrutha 

About JobFitts 

JobFitts Consultants are a specialist provider of professional Recruitment Services for the Financial Services sector and related suppliers in Australia. Since 2003 we have recruited and placed a breadth of operational roles at all levels from HR, Accounting, Marketing and Customer Service/Frontline. 

To find out more visit our website at JobFitts here or call us on (02) 9220 3595 or email here.

5 Must-Have Management Skills For The Digital Era Part 1

In a world where there is constant progression with technology, and artificial intelligence is used in ever increasing areas within organisations, it is, without doubt, a digital and disruptive workplace like nothing we have experienced before. 

As a manager or senior leader responsible for management development, there will no doubt be a question that has occupied your thinking at times that goes like this: For managers to succeed in the digital age, what are their “must have skills”? 

Only when you can answer this question can you then begin to think about how your organisation supports managers to build and develop this skill set. 

In a two-part series, we will share the five must-have skills: Communication Skills, Emotional Intelligence, An Ethical Compass, Agility and the need to build connections. So let’s get started and take this one by one. In part one we explore the first 3. 

Story Telling: Communication Skills 

 

 

A recent report on the use of the internet and social media showed Australians spent five hours and 5 minutes each day on the internet in 2018. The good news is that this is down 30 minutes from 2017.  Before we get too excited, our time on social media decreased by just 8 minutes over the entire year!

With technology playing such a key role in how we work, it is more important than ever that a manager has strong communication skills. Whether it’s one to one time, or meetings, being able to give direction, coach, influence, present, facilitate – each relies on a persons ability to get and hold their employeeattention and movthem into action. 

The most basic form of communication is sharing a compelling story. We only have to think of a small child and how they learn – through repetition. Repetition of their favourite story over and over again. As adults, we use “story time” as a way to engage and communicate with our small people. 

Be honest now, who haven’t created your own story using your son or daughterfavourite storybook characters to communicate an early life lesson?   

Emotional Intelligence

 

 

In the earlier stages of my career, the perception was that the senior leaders with the highest IQ would be the most successful. As we now know, this assumption has proven to be incorrect. 

Think of the friend or colleague who never allows their temper to get out of control, no matter what challenges they face. Alternatively, a senior manager you admire who enjoys total trust with their team. 
They listen to their team, are easy to talk to, and make considered and informed decisions.

These are some examples of a manager with a high degree of emotional intelligence. 

To clarify: Emotional intelligence or EI is the ability to understand and manage your own emotions, and those of the people around you. According to Daniel Goleman, the American psychologist who helped to popularise emotional intelligence, there are five critical elements to it: 

  • Self-awareness. 
  • Self-regulation. 
  • Motivation. 
  • Empathy. 
  • Social skills.
     

The more that you manage each of these areas, the higher your emotional intelligence. 
While there is Google Assistant and Amazon’s Alexa, the fact is that machines are rudimentary in their ability to understand the emotional tenor of a person, meeting, or organisation.

An Ethical Compass

 

 

The Deloitte Human Capital Trends Report in 2018 stated that organisations were no longer being judged solely by their financial performance and products. 

“Rather, organisations today are increasingly judged based on their relationships with their workers, their customers, and their communities, as well as their impact on society at large—transforming them from business enterprises into social enterprises.”

At the time of writing the 2019 Human Capital Trends has just been published and reports that;

“This year, we believe the pressures that have driven the rise of the social enterprise have become even more acute. They are forcing organisations to move beyond mission statements and philanthropy to learn to lead the social enterprise  and to reinvent themselves around a human focus.”

Of course, this isn’t about practising corporate social responsibility. It’s about recognising that while a business needs to generate profit, it must do so in a way that improves their employees, customers and the communities they operate in too; which is no mean feat.  

While it is the role of a CEO to solve this issue, what it means for managers is that their style of management must take into account the “human experience” each team member has of them. 

For example, how they:

1. Respond to requests for flexible working or working from home. 
2. Work with and support a team member who is experiencing mental health problems.
3. Manage the demands and deadlines from senior management and have the ability to push back.      Moreover, say no when there is a risk of it negatively impacting the team and consequently customers. 

AI demonstrates what a machine is and is not capable of. Humans are not machines, and it’s remembering that the days of soaring profits and whatever cost are no longer acceptable.  

In our next article, we will cover the final two areas of, agility and flexibility. Remember to look out for our email which will announce it’s publication.  

Thanks, 

 

Amrutha 

About JobFitts 

JobFitts Consultants are a specialist provider of professional Recruitment Services for the Financial Services sector and related suppliers in Australia. Since 2003 we have recruited and placed a breadth of operational roles at all levels, from HR, Accounting, Marketing and Customer Service/Frontline. 

To find out more visit our website at JobFitts here or call us on (02) 9220 3595 or email here.