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4 Things to Evaluate Before You Say ‘Yes’ to a Job Offer

Interviewing for, and being offered a new job, can be an exciting time, especially if it’s for a role or within a company that you have wanted for a while.  

But what many job seekers don’t consider is this – is this the right job to progress my career forward, or is this role simply what I am looking for ‘right now’? 

There are many things that a jobseeker must consider before making the decision; it is about far more than just the salary. 

Here are the most crucial points to consider before you say yes to your next job offer. 

 

1. Look at the Job Offer in Detail 

 

 

When you have interviewed for a position you really want, and you get the call from the recruiter with the offer, it can be tempting to say ‘yes’ straight away, but it is essential to read the full contract before you sign. 

In an interview, the manager might have promised a range of benefits, certain perks, or an alluring description of the role; I’ll talk more about this in the next section. But sometimes, the contract that is presented to you can be different from what you were promised in your interview; are the working hours the same as what was stated in the interview? Are there any surprises in the contract that were not mentioned to you?  

Sometimes this is not done out of malice; the hiring manager may have simply overlooked or misremembered these points. You do not have to accept the offer straight away, you can call the manager to talk over any concerns you might have at this point, and if you need longer to decide – ask when is the latest that they need your answer by. 

Read the contract thoroughly and weigh up the pros and possible cons of this job vs your current role by using a comparison list, like this one from The Balance. 

 

2. Consider the Benefits and Perks 

The added benefits that accompany your salary can be a deal-breaker for many candidates – with some people believing that they are more important than the salary itself.  

Yes, it can be tempting to take a new job when the salary is considerably higher than your current one, but I advise you to think carefully about how beneficial the benefits in your job offer are. 

It is considered that perks can represent up to around 30% of your compensation package, and a good benefits package should include health insurance and retirement plans. 

Additional benefits such as dental, vision and life insurance, are great perks to consider and are generally better for you in the long run than a small amount of extra salary. 

 

3. Training and Development

 

Many of the candidates I work with tell me that their number one reason for looking for a new job is that they felt that their role had no future – their manager or company were not interested in developing them, and so their job title and prospects were likely to stay the same for as long as they were in that position. 

Training and development is a big deal to candidates – knowing that your employer is invested in your career is a primary reason to stay and grow with the company. 

If the interviewer doesn’t mention training and development during the interview – be sure to ask. Moving to a company who will invest in your training and development is always a better choice than staying with one that won’t. 

If you are sure that the salary and compensation package, as well as the growth opportunities, will be beneficial to your career, there is just one point left to consider – the company’s culture. 

 

4. Company Culture  

Before you attended your interview with this company, what made you apply? Was it the way that the company presented itself in the job advert, did they appeal to you after doing some online research, or were they already on your radar? 

It is understandable that some people are tempted by a job offer because of a dazzling salary, but it is crucial that as a jobseeker you ask yourself ‘can I really see myself being happy here? 

 

 

A poor culture fit is one of the main reasons that people leave their job – with 69% of respondents in one study stating that they were looking to leave their current role as soon as possible due to a poor culture fit. 

When you think about the reality of the situation, would you really be able to last long enough in a job where you were unhappy with to make it worthwhile? During the interview and throughout the recruitment process, think carefully about the culture and the ‘feel’ of the company.  

Does the organisation have a diverse and happy workforce? Do they value honesty and honesty in their mission statement? Do they encourage employees to maintain a healthy work-life balance, or have you picked up on the fact that a degree of unpaid overtime is the ‘norm’?  

It isn’t always easy to find these things out before you start, but you can do your best to discover more by carefully looking at their website, social media profiles and even reaching out to members of staff on LinkedIn to get an idea of the attitudes and behaviours that the team exhibit.  

 

Finally 

If you are looking for your next job in finance, accountancy, HR, business intelligence, plus many more sectors, start your conversation with Jobfitts today. 

Our approach of finding candidates their perfect role is so successful that 98% of our placements stay in position for at least two years – what are you waiting for? Contact us today.  

  

Thanks,  

Amrutha Murali 

Personality Traits To Hire Into Your Organisation

You might have heard the recruiting phrase, ‘hire for personality, train for skill’ – but how true is it? 

When you interview two candidates with similar skills and qualifications, the hiring decision ultimately comes down to whichever candidate ‘wows’ you on the day with something other than their hard skills – the candidates with the skills and personality usually get selected. 

So in answer to the previous question; yes, personality traits are very important to employers, when they come with a candidate who either has or has the potential to possess the hard skills needed to do the job. 

In this article, I want to talk about what personality traits you should be looking to hire into your organisation, and when a personality trait is sometimes just as vital as a skill or qualification – yes, this is sometimes the case. 

 

Spot the Difference 

 

 

Let me get you to think about the scenario I mentioned in the previous paragraph.  

Imagine you have a vacancy for tax accountant position in your business, and you interview two candidates who both have the required amount of experience with reputable firms, but on the day of the interview, they give two very different interviews.  

One candidate talks at length about their passion for the role, their hunger for a new challenge and how they still take pleasure from all aspects of their job, despite this being their 15th year in the sector. 

The other candidate is less enthusiastic; they spend more time talking about the parts of their job they would like to change, and tell you they prefer working on their own rather than part of a team. 

I would like you to bear this scenario in mind, and at the end of this article, I will advise you on the type of personality traits that will add real value to your business, and how to spot these traits in the interview. 

 

Know Your Team 

So, you’ve got a vacancy for a tax specialist, but you’re only a small team. How much thought did you give to the personality traits that your current team possess when you hired them? How well do your current team get along  – and is this because you had a personality hiring strategy in place, or was it a happy accident?  

Understanding the identity and the drives of each member of your team is the first step to knowing the ‘type’ of person you need. 

If your place of work is relatively small and there is a friendly but conscientious atmosphere, will hiring a boisterous ‘wild card’ really be a good idea – even if they have all of the desirable qualifications?  

When you begin your hiring process for your new team member, the first thing you need to do is map out the traits within your current team. Having a company value statement for your organisation is a great way to ensure you continually hire people whose attitudes fit with your vision – for example: 

We’re a customer-focused team who takes pride in our authentic and ethical working practices. 

Have this value and vision statement at the forefront of your mind when making your next hiring decision; better still, have it made into a physical sign and displayed somewhere prominently in the office.  

 

 

How Important is the ‘Right’ Personality? 

If you’re still thinking ‘but surely, skills are more important than personality traits’, let’s take a look at some data. 

A study conducted by global learning institute Hyper Island on the future of hiring returned some surprising results. They interviewed over 500 CEOs, managing directors and creative directors on the top qualities they look for in a new hire, and an overwhelming majority of 79% stated that ‘personality’ was the most important.  

‘Skill-set’ received just 39%, which was beaten by ‘cultural alignment’ which received 53%.  

And Virgin Group founder, billionaire Richard Branson, echoed this sentiment in a recent LinkedIn article, where he stated : 

The first thing to look for when searching for a great employee is somebody with a personality that fits with your company culture – most skills can be learned, but it is difficult to train people on their personality. 

 

Personality Traits to Hire for Success 

 

 

As a hiring manager, it is your job to make sure that you hire employees who can bring the team closer to the organisational goal, but also to create a strong team who can work together. There is no point in having great individual talent if they are dysfunctional in the way they operate as a whole.  

The following is a list of the most desirable personality traits to look for in your new hire, which will add real value to your organisation  

  • Openness – these individuals are receptive to new ideas, changing processes and have innate innovation; all great qualities. 
  • Honesty – in a team of any size, you need to know that you can trust every member implicitly. 
  • Independent thinkers – these individuals are great at challenging the status quo and pushing for changes for the better of the whole organisation. 
  • Passion and enthusiasm – a candidate who is slightly less qualified but far more passionate about the role is always worth a second interview. 
  • A team player – lookout for suggestions that your candidate is driven by working as a team towards a common goal. 

 

Finally 

If you have struggled to identify and attract the ‘right’ kind of candidates to your organisation, or need assistance with your hiring processes, contact Jobfitts today to find out how we can help. 

 

Thanks,  

Amrutha Murali 

Why Now Is the Perfect Time to Consider a Move into Temporary Work

Temporary and contract work is one of the fastest-growing areas of recruitment, and this is only set to rise – the reason being that more and more candidates are considering temporary employment for a multitude of reasons. 

From a temporary Business Analyst needed to help complete a big project to a legal secretary covering maternity leave, the Australian temporary job market is thriving. 

A recent Hayes salary guide revealed that nearly a quarter (23%) of Australian businesses regularly employ temporary or contract staff, and 44% reported to use them for special projects or workloads. Casual workers now account for 22% of all employees, up from 20% four years ago. 

There has been a general shift across the world from the regular 9-5 into more flexible ways of working; this has been bolstered by our 24/7 lifestyles and ‘gig-economy’ work such as freelancing and contracting. 

First, I want to share with you some of the reasons behind the shift from traditional, towards a less stringent way of working and then I will talk about some of the benefits employees can reap from utilising temporary contracts.  

 

Changing Perceptions  

 

 

During my time as a recruiter, I have seen a drastic change in the way temporary and contract work is perceived.  

In the last five years, I have seen an astonishing increase in the number of candidates who are not only willing to consider temporary work, but they are actively looking for it.  

Whereas once temporary work might have been limited to only certain types of jobs, it now encompasses a vast range of employment; in fact, experts predict that the increase in temporary workers over the coming years will be most significant in IT departments where 37% of employers regularly use temporary employees.  

 

Flexible Lifestyles 

It was once considered that temporary or contract worker was less stable and therefore less desirable – it was sometimes regarded as a ‘last resort’ for employees who’s real goal was a full-time, permanent contract.  

While the 9-5 Monday-Friday model used to be the goal for many people, employees are now seeking out ways to make their careers more flexible, so that they can manage their career around their family life, and not have to struggle to fit one in around the other.  

It is now considered by many that the most popular type of career is one where you can pick and choose the times of the year or the length of contracts that you work with. This type of flexible working style is not just limited to freelancers; we have seen it across the board, with interim directors and C-suite roles.  

 

The Real Benefits of Temporary Work 

 

 

Let me explain in more detail how you can benefit from temporary work, and why it’s not just limited to junior positions.  

Temporary work is gaining popularity, and it doesn’t matter whether you are a contract IT worker or a Chief Financial Officer looking to take semi-retirement – you can benefit.  

 

Family Values 

The rise of the dual-career couple has signified one thing – that people who want to start a family are less prepared to sacrifice their career for it. They are finding new ways to be able to have it all – a progressing career and the ability to raise a family.  

Taking temporary work at intervals through the year is an excellent way for a dual-career couple to manage their work vs family life and with careful planning, it can allow both partners to take turns with parenting. 

 

A Career Change 

 

 

As a recruiter, I often come into contact with people who have decided that now is the time in their life that they are going to change the direction of or to choose an entirely new career. This is becoming more common – the average worker will now change jobs 12 times throughout their working life, and while these changes are often a promotion or a different job within the same company, sometimes they are into a new field. 

Temporary and contract work is constructive for employees looking to gain experience in a new field, or to try out something new to see if it works for them. 

 

Executive and C-Suite 

Temporary and executive are not two words that you might expect to see in the same sentence, but the truth is that temporary executive and C-suite roles have been present in recruitment for years, but they go by a different name – interim.  

Interim directors provide temporary support to organisations, usually through a difficult period or a time of significant change like a merger or a takeover. Their expertise is essential, and they supply the business with critical strategies that the company could not internally manifest. An interim director is typically employed for between three and nine months, and these roles are perfect for more experienced senior employees who are looking to relax their career. 

 

Finally 

I hope this article has helped you to understand how the general consensus regarding temporary work has changed in the last few years. A wide range of employees will benefit from considering temporary work, as it can help both your career and your personal life to thrive in the way that you want.   

We have a range of options available to candidates who are considering temporary work, from IT support to executive roles, get in contact with us today to find out how we can help. 

 

Thanks,  

Amrutha Murali 

The Five Things That Go Through a Candidate’s Mind Before an Interview

The current hiring market is candidate-led, and this can leave employers in an awkward position. 

When you need to fill an integral role such as a Credit Underwriter, or perhaps your team is expanding and you need several Business Analysts – if you’ve spoken to a few suitable candidates, what you need to know now is precisely what the candidates are looking for at the interview stage. 

In this article, I will explain some of the biggest concerns that candidates have when deciding on a new company, and what goes through their minds before the interview; by understanding this, you can eliminate the guesswork from your interview and onboarding process.  

With 65% of candidates saying that a bad interview experience makes them lose interest in a job, what are the key things that candidates are looking for from their interview?  

Let’s go through them. 

 

1. Will This Company Offer Me Development Opportunities? 

 

 

I’ll start with this issue as it’s one that my candidates raise regularly. Often when a company is failing to recruit and retain competent employees, it comes down to training and development opportunities – or lack thereof. 

LinkedIn’s 2018 Workforce Learning Report found that 93% of employees would stay with a company longer if it invested in their careers. 

In the interview, employers are keen to find out if the candidate sitting in front of them is right for the role in question, but as a recruitment consultant, my advice is to be longer-sighted than this. Yes, the candidate might be perfect for the IT or banking vacancy you currently have in your team, but will they continue to be as valued in the coming months and years? Candidates want long-term career prospects, and if your interview fails to highlight these opportunities, this can be a red flag for them.  

 

2. Will I Fit in Here? 

I mentioned earlier that the current Australian job market is candidate-led, but how significantly? Well, earlier this year the unemployment rate hovered at around 5% – a 6 ½ year low.  

High employment rates and an increase in job opportunities have meant that now more than ever, candidates are not only looking for a career with prospects but also for job that they love, and which will offer them a great company culture and a harmonious work-life balance.  

Candidates will be looking out for evidence in the interview that the culture of your organisation is somewhere where they will thrive and feel appreciated.  

Alongside an excellent compensation package, candidates assess your company culture on whether you provide extras such as health insurance, a wellness policy, flexible working opportunities, an inclusive and friendly environment….I realise that for some employers getting this right can seem like added pressure to please their employees, but the reality of the situation is that this is what employers have to do to attract the kind of talent that they want in the current job market. 

 

3. What Exactly Will My Responsibilities Be? 

 

 

Banking and FinTech candidates are increasingly eager to understand where they fit into their company’s bigger picture. 

A failure to be transparent in what the exact role and responsibilities are expected of the candidate will leave them feeling confused and uncertain of if they ‘fit’ into the company as a whole. A lack of clarity in  roles can come from when a company has not clearly defined the job responsibilities and objectives. 

For example, when looking to recruit a Collections Manager, will there be systems in place already, or will the candidate be expected to set up the Collection functions from scratch?  

A recent study found that 43% of new employees who quit within the first 90 days stated that the reason was that their role was different from that which was presented to them during the hiring process.  

Set aside time before the interview to clearly define the candidate’s daily responsibilities, plus objectives for the future of their role – candidates will want to know that their role has clarity and direction.  

 

4. How Will I Be Managed? 

You might have heard the phrase ‘employees don’t leave their job, they leave their manager’ – and this adage is true. A Gallup poll found that the top reason employees give for their resignation is the relationship they had with their boss or immediate supervisor. 

Candidates in the current job market are looking out for a manager who will be supportive and openminded to the often changeable and sometimes difficult life of a FinTech employee. Tell your candidate in the interview what kind of management style is employed in your company, and ask them how they like to be managed, so that there is a clear understanding in this area from the start. 

 

5. How Long Will the Process Take? 

 

 

I’ve left this point until last, but I want to affirm how essential this is to the candidate. A lengthy hiring process will drive the best FinTech candidates towards your competitors.  

My recommended process for hiring the best candidates is between two and four weeks, from start to finish. When quality candidates are looking for a new job, they will usually have several opportunities to consider at the same time, and they will be put off by having to wait for what they consider to be an unnecessarily long amount of time.  

One finance candidate that I recently worked with told me that a company he had interviewed with contacted him six weeks after his first interview – at this point he was already settled into a new role in a different organisation.  

Let your candidate know precisely how long the process will take and keep to the time-frame you set out! 

 

Finally 

This article should have highlighted the most important points that highly skilled  candidates consider on their recruitment journey, and what ultimately sways them in making their big decision. Jobfitts work with quality candidates which means we can match the right candidates to roles in which they will excel and grow with the company – 98% of our candidates stay in their role for at least two years. 

If you need help recruiting top talent into your organisation, get in touch with us today to discover how we can help.  

 

Thanks,  

Amrutha Murali 

Employing Temporary Workers – What You Need to Know

The world of work is changing rapidly – nearly a quarter of Australian employers report using temporary or contract staff regularly, with a further 44% utilising them for special projects or workloads. 

The idea of the standard working week is shifting from what it was in the past few decades, as the digital revolution has made remote jobs more accessible, and the need for a different type of workforce has emerged with our 24/7 culture.  

Freelancing has increased across all sectors, and the number of casual workers in Australia has risen from 20.8% around four years ago to 22.6%. 

In the past, temporary work was viewed as something of a ‘stop-gap’ for those between jobs, but this is not the case anymore. Highly skilled professionals such as accountants, graphic designers and marketers are increasingly choosing ‘gig’ work over a regular career option for the benefits of freedom, the ability to travel and to fit around their busy family lives. 

As a recruiter, I have seen first-hand the immense benefits that temporary workers can bring to an organisation – don’t overlook these crucial points when considering temporary employees. 

 

Fast and Flexible 

The two primary situations when I would suggest considering contract workers is to take care of a temporary staffing issue such as maternity or a sudden staff shortage or to help with the extra workload of a big project.  

One of the main benefits of hiring temporary workers is the speed at which a recruiter will be able to fill your vacancy. Temporary workers are familiar with being placed quickly in roles, as opposed to often weeks and sometimes months that it takes to find a permanent candidate for your position. 

 

It Isn’t More Hassle 

Sometimes, an employer will be reluctant to go down the temporary route believing that plugging their gap with a temporary employee is more work for their business when in reality, a temporary worker is a perfect solution to their current staffing issue. 

A big part of employers’ reluctance to hire temporary workers is the perceived confusion around temporary contracts. Many employers believe that hiring a temp worker carries the risk of being slower, more complicated and more expensive than waiting it out for the perfect long-term employee; in reality, the opposite is true. 

Aexceptional  recruiter can find temporary skilled employees for your organisation in a way that is faster, less expensive and easier than struggling along waiting for the ‘right’ candidate or worse – permanently hiring an employee who is wrong for your company. This in itself can be a huge problem – the cost of a wrong hire is estimated to be between $7,000-$10,000 and even higher for executive positions.  

 

A Unique Set of Skills 

The nature of temporary work means that these employees have a unique set of skills that those who have been in the same company (or role) for years do not possess.  

Freelance or contract workers are generally more adaptable, quicker at picking up new skills and can integrate with ease at a much higher level than ‘traditional’ employees.  

Staff shortages can put extra pressure on an already stretched workforce, and this can lead to severe problems such as low staff morale, decreased productivity and even physical and mental health problems. Temporary workers can bring a new outlook to stressed personnel and will boost morale as the workload is shared. Your employees will be grateful that you are pro-active throughout your temporary staffing issues. 

 

Interim Directors  

There has been an increase in demand for temporary/interim executives as companies struggle in the current skill-short candidate market to find the right people to fill executive positions.  

Interim directors are often referred to as ‘consultants’ as they are called upon to help a business through a tricky situation or a time of significant change, but there is a difference between consultants and true temporary directors. A true temporary director will not only identify the issues in the organisation that need solving, but they will also roll their sleeves up and get to work themselves. 

Temporary directors are invaluable to businesses who need a specialist in their sector with substantial experience who is able to steer the business through a time when strong leadership is needed.  

 

How a Recruiter Can Help 

Recruitment companies have done historically well in the temporary work sector, as we are skilled at putting the right people in the right jobs, quickly. 

Working with a recruitment company like JobFitts will ensure that not only is your business provided with the right temporary candidates, that we can cover the vast majority of administration and HR responsibilities – freeing up your valuable time. 

To find out how JobFitts can help your organisation to grow with temporary workers, get in contact with us today. 

Thanks,  

Amrutha Murali 

How to Prepare for a Skype Interview

A job interview for an exciting new role can be one of the most nerve-wracking and memorable experiences in your life – as a recruiter, I see candidates receive life-changing job offers on a regular basis – it never fails to excite me! 

Working with companies and candidates across the board, I have seen a spike in the number of initial interviews being conducted via Skype or other video programs.  

I am asked time and again by candidates on how to prepare for and conduct a Skype interview, so here are my top tips. 

 

Check Your Speed 

Increasingly, Skype interviews are happening in public places such as local libraries, in your car or even quiet coffee spots – basically anywhere you can get a quiet place and, more importantly, away from your current workplace. This is understandable as our working lives are increasingly busy, and you might only have a specific timeframe to be able to conduct your interview. 

If you have no alternative than to conduct your interview where you are relying on someone else’s internet speed, it is important to check the speed of the internet before you decide on this as a suitable interview place. Internet speeds in public places can be highly unreliable, so where possible, we suggest using your own home, that of a friend or relative, or an office space where you can guarantee that you will have enough bandwidth. 

Remember to make sure you have Skype (or the interview software that you will be using) downloaded on your device and that your username and password are correct, and sign in a few minutes early. 

 

A Quiet Place 

Alongside internet speeds, if you must conduct your interview somewhere other than your home or office, make sure that your place of choice is as quiet as possible, with no distractions.  

If you must use a coffee shop, avoid the lunchtime rush hour. If you are interviewing from your car park away from busy roads and in a quiet spot, turn noisy engines and air-con off. 

 

Make Notes – But Don’t Rely on Them 

You might be nervous, and this is understandable if the role is one you’ve wanted for a while, or for a company you admire. I always suggest to candidates to make notes to help them remember certain topics they might want to cover or specific stories they want to talk about – but not to rely too heavily on these notes. 

What I don’t suggest is trying to memorise your notes word for word or consulting them every time you go to answer a question. Always looking down at your notes will make you appear nervous (even if you aren’t) and the breaking of eye contact will not put the interviewer at ease. 

The key is to familiarise yourself with your notes – this can be done in the days leading up to your Skype interview (don’t leave it until the last minute) and use them as a frame of reference for the interview, not a hard and fast guide. You want your conversation to flow freely, and this is hard to achieve when you refuse to stray from a determined set of answers.  

Sometimes candidates tell me that they made a long list of notes, only for them to completely forget about them once the interview has started! Each interview is different, remember to gauge the tone and pace of the interview – your notes are there to help you if you get stuck, it’s not a script. 

 

Work the Camera 

It is tempting in Skype interviews to look at yourself on the screen, rather than into the camera of your device, but remember to resist the urge to do this – it is off-putting and can make you come across as vain, self-centred or simply confused by the whole process. 

Dress in smart attire that you would wear if you were attending a face-to-face interview, and yes, I suggest from the waist down also. If you must get up suddenly in the middle of the interview, you don’t want the interviewer seeing that you’re wearing gym shorts. 

Smile and don’t be afraid to use hand gestures, even if you aren’t sure if the interviewer can see them. I feel that in Skype interviews, it can be harder to let your personality come across than in a face-to-face interview, so you might need to try a little harder to let your true self come across. 

It can be strange conducting a Skype or video interview, especially if you aren’t used to them, so it is useful to remember that they are not as formal as a face-to-face interview and that once you have cleared this stage, you can wow the interviewer in real-life. 

If you are still looking for your next role to progress your career, get in touch with us today to find out how we can help. 

Thanks,  

Amrutha Murali 

Why Quality Candidates Are Rejecting Your Job Offers This Year

The number of job vacancies in Australia is at an all-time high, with 242,900 at the last count. While this represents strong economy, which is ultimately good for business, it leads to issues when it comes to recruiting. 

A tight job market means that candidates have their choice of available jobs – so companies must work harder to attract the attention of the best candidates. 

As a recruiter, I understand how frustrating it can be when a potentially excellent candidate match falls through – for whatever the reason, but it can be particularly difficult when the candidate chooses to work for a competitor instead of you. 

So, I have put together this guide on the main reasons candidates are likely to reject your job offer, so you will know what to avoid to get the quality candidates to say ‘yes’. 

 

Your Compensation Package Isn’t Good Enough 

First and foremost, you must be offering your candidates salary and benefits package which is at least as good the other companies your candidates will likely have considered. 

While a competitive salary is a must, employers are having to be increasingly market-aware when it comes to giving candidates an offer they can’t refuse. 

Just recently I was working with a candidate who was considering two similar job offers; the salary offered in both positions was comparable, but the deciding factor was that one company was offering a much better health insurance package and the availability to work from home sometimes  – the candidate had a young family and these benefits really spoke to her. 

If you can offer candidates benefits such as  

  • Healthcare insurance 
  • Additional Superannuation  
  • A company car 
  • Work laptop/mobile 
  • Homeworking opportunities 
  • Flexible working hours 
  • Gym membership 
  • Subsidised food and drink 
  • Commission (if applicable) 

Then you are more likely to be seen as a more attractive employer to all potential employees. These perks are more than affordable for larger companies, and they will pay dividends in attracting the best talent and creating a happier working environment. 

 

Little Chance of Promotion 

The workforce of the last 30 years has been dominated by boomers; however, this is set to change. It is estimated that by 2020, millennials and X-ers will make up 35% and 35% of the workforce respectively, with boomers accounting for a mere 6%.   

Younger workers have felt a sense of frustration that they don’t stand a chance of being promoted to above, or even equal to, their more experienced superiors. 

 So, offering promotion prospects to Gen X, millennial and Gen Z employees is a reliable way to attract them to your organisation. 

A recent Business Insider survey found that more than 75% of Gen Z workers believed that they should be promoted within their first year of work. When a promotion is simply not an option, employers are offering substitutes such as a raise, being offered a new title and ‘workversary’ celebrations so that they feel valued. 

If you can offer some of these promotion-related benefits perks, this will help in getting your candidate to say yes to your offer. 

 

Your Recruitment Process is Too Slow 

One of the main benefits companies report in working with recruiters is that the speeding up of the process drastically reduces the number of great candidates who drop out of the process along the way. 

One of the main reasons we hear from candidates as to why they remove themselves from the recruitment process is that the process takes too long and in that time, another company has made them an offer that they decide to take instead. Even candidates who are particularly interested in your company over another can be tempted away by a swift recruitment process.   

It is widely accepted that your time to fill should be as short as possible. The Society of Human Resource Management reports the average time to fill is 42 days – how does your company measure up? 

 

Your Culture Doesn’t Speak to Them 

Many smaller companies fall into the trap of believing that creating a great ‘company culture’ is reserved for bigger organisations. 

There is the idea that you need to spend lots of time (and money) on staff away-days, employee events and programs, office relaxation spaces and monthly guest speakers – but it does not have to be this involved. 

Creating a positive company culture can be attainable for every single business, all you need is two things. Firstly, a company ethos and mission statement which you have thought about carefully, and secondlyto hire people who fit into the ethos and agree with the mission statement. 

I have worked with companies of all sizes, and great company culture is not something which is only achievable for a select few, nor is size important – I have witnessed fantastic company culture from a range of differently-sized businesses. 

In order to highlight to candidates why your organisation should be their first choice, tell them about your culture in the interview. If possible, take them into the office to see how employees interact with each other, and direct them to your company social media where they can see what values your organisation stands for. 

Remember, this is also a two-way street; both you and the candidate need to discern if this is a partnership that will work out.  

If you need help, not only attracting the best candidates to interview with your company but to say yes to the final job offer – get in touch with us today to find out how we can help.  

 

Thanks,  

Amrutha Murali 

What to Do When You Are Rejected for Being Overqualified

During my time as a recruiter, I have matched countless candidates to a wide variety of skills and positions, and I can say confidently – you never know what’s around the corner.  

I have seen all manner of hiring partnerships and recruiting trends come and go over the years. 

But increasingly, there has been a rise in the number of candidates being turned away from even executive roles for being ‘overqualified’. 

This is as frustrating for me as I know it is for the candidate – but it is also understandable. 

In recruiting, being told that you are overqualified usually means that the hiring manager thinks you are either going to get boredbecome unsatisfied too quickly or that you are using this role as a steppingstone until something better comes along. 

But as the world of work has changed around us, there is not one ‘set’ trajectory for many careers or professions anymore. It is now quite common for candidates of all abilities to seek out new challenges – a change of career direction, training in an area you have always been interested in or a move to a new city; there are plenty of reasons for candidates of all abilities apply for a range of roles. 

This has led to a mismatch between the available roles and the types of people applying – and it has led to some confusion for hiring managers. 

If you have been turned away from a role and the reason was that you were ‘overqualified’, it can be disheartening, but, remember – you aren’t the only one.  

This article discusses the current issue of ‘overqualified’ applicants and what to do if you find yourself in this situation.  

 

Go Direct (to the Recruiter or Hiring Manager) 

 

 

This is probably the most crucial piece of advice I have, and so I’ll cover it first. 

If you are applying to a role direct or using a recruiter, make sure you speak directly to the hiring manager (or get the recruiter to talk to them on your behalf) to position yourself before you start your formal application. 

This is a critical step as it allows you to explain your situation. Yes, you might be applying for a role which they consider is below your level of expertise, but there’s a reason for it – and this is your opportunity to explain your situation, showing how serious you are about the position. 

This will put the hiring manager at ease and set you apart from the other applicants. It is such an easy way to give yourself an advantage over the other applicants, but you would be surprised as to how many candidates overlook it.  

 

Explain Your Position 

 

 

Often, when an HR manager is looking at a CV or Resume of someone who they think is overqualified, they presume that you will get bored in your position or move on quickly.  

Yes, you may be overqualified for the role, but in explaining exactly why you are applying for this job at this time, it will put their mind at ease. 

Another reason I see candidates being rejected is the belief that the company will not be able to afford them due to their extensive experience. 

This is one of the times when I would suggest mentioning salary at an earlier opportunity. You don’t have to be explicit, but if you really want the job, it’s worth mentioning at the start of your conversation that you are aware this might be an issue, and that you are prepared to negotiate.  

 

Sell Your Transferable Skills 

 

 

Being rejected for being ‘overqualified’ for a job can be a confusing time for any job seeker. If it were a relationship, we’d be hearing the words ‘it’s not you, it’s me’… 

There are plenty of reasons for the hiring manager to hire you, but they often get put off initially by the perceived imbalance of skills and/or salary expectations. 

In your initial talk with the hiring manager, be sure to highlight your transferable skills. Demonstrate your communication skills, teamwork/team leader experience (if applicable), organisational skills, adaptability and work ethic. 

Likewise, it can be a sensible idea to downplay particular previous experience if it is irrelevant to the position you are applying for.  

For example, if you have previously held a few different management roles and are now applying for a lower-level position, you might only include the most recent post. Similarly, you might want to omit a higher-level position you held in a field unrelated to the job you are currently applying. 

Finally, as recruiters, we strongly advise tailoring your CV specifically to each role you apply for. 

 

How Your Recruiter Can Help 

A recruiter can help guide you through the process of applying for jobs that your CV might not align with, whatever the reason. 

A good recruiter will be able to help you tailor your CV to the positions that you want, will be able to guide you through the interview with their expertise, and crucially, they can be the key to getting you the interviews you really want in the first place.  

If you have been turned down for a position you truthfully wanted for being ‘overqualified’ and aren’t sure what your next steps should be, speak to a recruiter, like the experts at Jobfitts. 

 

Thanks, 

Amrutha Murali 

The Role of a Recruiter in Your Candidate Experience Strategy

Many employers are now in the habit of ensuring their company delivers an excellent employee experience, but when was the last time you assessed your candidate experience? 

The candidate experience is the journey each candidate who applies to your organisation goes through, from the first email or application through to the interview day and job offer. 

The journey that your candidates go on is essential for both the candidate and your businessGood candidate experience will ensure you are futureproofing your business to attract the best calibre of candidate, and it gives your organisation an opportunity to grow its talent pool and strengthens your overall employer brand. 

In the busy process of recruiting, it can be easy for an email to get missed, a candidate to be left un-replied to, or worse – ignored completely. As recruiters, we see these occurrences all too often.  

This can be damaging to your organisation as it weakens your brand and puts off potential candidates from ever applying again, not to mention everyone else they speak to about their experience. 

Your organisation will find it much easier to provide an excellent candidate experience with the help of a good-quality recruitment expert – and in this article, we will explain why.  

 

What Is the Candidate Experience? 

 

 

The candidate experience describes everything candidates who apply to an organisation experience from first clicking on a job advert or description, right through to receiving a job offer and negotiating their salary. 

In the past, companies often came under fire for their poor recruiting habits, and especially in the post-recession era of the last decade – there were so many candidates applying to so few roles that businesses with small HR departments found it impossible to reply to each application individually. This meant that some candidates slipped through the net – sometimes, really valuable candidates.  

But times have changed recently – and rapidly. It has only been in the last five or so years that ‘review culture’ has taken off – with companies encouraging customers to review their product, service or experience online for all to see. 

The candidate experience is all about effective communication. This includes whether your candidate gets a confirmation email after sending their application (this Monster survey found that, shockingly, 86% of applicants do not receive a confirmation email after applying for a job). 

A great candidate experience not only educates potential employees about your companybut it also projects a positive company culture. If the applicant is not lucky first time round but they have a good overall experience, they are statistically more likely to apply again in future. 

 

Why is Candidate Experience SImportant? 

Last week I needed to buy something for my house. Upon browsing my regular go-to sites, I found myself overlooking the price, delivery cost and times, and went straight to the reviews – I’m sure you have done something similar yourself. 

Customer reviews have become indispensable in the modern world. We don’t only like to read them – we have come to expect them – in all aspects of our lives, from buying a kettle to booking a month-long cruise, and recruitment is no different. 

 

 

Positive candidate experience is essential in today’s job market for several reasons. One Hay Group study found that 70% of graduates are put off by someone else’s bad experience with a company – a negative candidate experience might be turning away potential talent before it has even applied to your organisation. 

In giving an excellent candidate experience, you are not only fulfilling a courteous agreement which benefits the candidate, but you are also enhancing your talent pipeline.  

 

Your Candidate Experience as a Talent Pipeline  

You might be thinking that there is little incentive for the employer to give a great candidate experience, but this is not true. 

In the current skills-short job market, it has never been more critical to build a talent pipeline for your company – a culture of individuals who are aware and engaged with your company, who are likely to apply in future when then right position comes up. 

This can be hard to cultivate naturally, but it is something which a recruiter can help with. Candidates don’t often have candid conversations with their potential employer about their job prospects and aspirations – but they do with their recruiter. 

A recruiter will liaise with active and passive candidates on your behalfallowing you to give them the best experience and at the same time creating a talent pipeline of engaged candidates for any of your future vacancies.  

 

How Can a Recruiter Help to Improve Your Candidate Experience  

 

 

How can you ensure that every candidate who applies to work for you has a positive experience? 

As mentioned previously, a good channel of communication is the main thing that candidates are looking for from their potential employers. If you don’t have a dedicated recruiter whose job it is to take care of every applicant, communication can sometimes slip. This is why it is so crucial to work with a recruiter – they take care of every email and enquiry with their sector-specialist knowledge. 

Poor candidate experience can come from their expectations being too high, or they realise that their values do not align with the company half-way through the process. These are things that little can be done to remedy. 

However, the reasons for a poor experience have been outlined in the extensive Talent Board Candidate Experience Benchmark Research Report 2018. The main negative reason candidates gave for withdrawing from the application process due to bad experience was that the process simply took too long. 

One of the main benefits of utilising a recruiter is that they drastically reduce the amount of time that the recruitment process takes.  

Having the luxury of time to spend with each candidate is something a recruiter can afford, that most companies do not have. This is the way to create the best candidate experience, to boost your employer branding and to create that all-important talent pipeline for the future.  

If you have got to the stage where you feel you need a recruiter to help enhance your candidate experience strategy – contact us today.  

 

Thanks,  

Amrutha Murali